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I Can Has Cheezburger?

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My colleague and friend, Christy Tucker, posted earlier this week about e-learning courses that use Discussion Boards as a dumping ground for uninspired responses to mediocre questions. These types of assignments don’t encourage peer feedback as they were meant to do. She has a point. And, I have to admit, I’m guilty of some of this as well.

So, here is my response to her thought provoking questions about this topic:

Is that not the job of the ID, then, to make sure that discussion boards are used for just that purpose? Discussion?

It can be very easy to fall into the “oh just put it in the Discussion Board” mentality. Which, of course, gives you the gallery of mediocrity rather than the interesting and thought provoking place it was meant to be.

What, then, are the qualifications of a good discussion? How can we, as IDs, balance the “what did you learn” (which has its place) with the “how can it be applied” assignments and discussions? At what point should peer feedback be the main deciding factor? Or should it?

Using peer feedback is a great tool. But that’s what it is..a tool. We cannot rely on using peer feedback as the main or, in some cases, only way to start or maintain a conversation. We need to be able to design the assignments so that they themselves spark interest/controversy/discussion.

For the current course I’m developing, my SME (subject matter expert) wants to include an example of how various media are currently used together – hybrid media, if you will. The example is Line Rider.

Which is completely and totally addicting. Why o why did he have to show this to me? I have been fervently trying to figure out how the heck to keep my little sledding guy on the line and not fall into space. Or, worse yet, take a header on a loop-de-loop.

Think I’m nuts? You take a shot at it. See if you’re any better at it than I am.

And did I mention that people actually set their animations to music? Here’s a fantastic example of what a very talented person who has lots of time on his/her hands can accomplish with this little addicting “game”:

Attack of the Killer Bunny!

Two days ago, after filling the gas tank on our aging Pontiac, I noticed that the cab of the car smelled like gasoline.

At first, I thought maybe I had spilled some in the cab. Of course, this would have been an incredible feat of contortionism since all the doors were closed and the gas tank is located towards the back of the car.

Then I thought maybe I had tracked some in on my shoes. But no, my shoes didn’t smell like gasoline. It was a bit of a mystery.

When I got home, I mentioned the awful smell to DH. He immediately began sniffing around the car. His nose led him to the engine.

After popping the hood, DH said the smell got even worse. He had me turn on the car and then immediately screamed, “Turn it off! Turn it off!”

Apparently, there is a hole in the gas line and it was shooting gas into the engine. Oops.

So, the consensus was that we wouldn’t be driving the car anytime soon. Which, of course, puts a crimp in all family-centered activities. Like taking kids to school. Grocery shopping. Doctor’s appointments. You get the idea.

Yesterday, though, I get a phone call from DH asking…pleading, really…that I bring his wallet to him at the child care center. He’d locked his keys inside the truck and would have called AAA but his wallet was sitting on my dresser.

*sigh*

I reminded him that the car could explode at any moment. He said he’d take the risk. Gee, thanks, sweetie.

So, there I was. Driving as slowly as I possibly could. Terrified that little bits of WAHM and small baby would be raining down on unsuspecting cars on the road. I could just see it now, the papers headline would be “Exploding WAHM Halts Traffic”.

I eventually did make it to the school. Without exploding.

And I made it home. Without exploding.

But I’m definitely not driving my car again until DH fixes that hose. I’d hate to end up as a bad headline in the local paper.

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